Nigeria Fundamental Human Right

Nigeria Fundamental Human Right

Nigeria Fundamental Human Right

The imperatives of upholding human rights and raising the standard of living for Nigerians have consistently been addressed in the political platforms of the country’s democratically elected governments over the years. Even after making campaign pledges, Nigerians’ levels of poverty continue to increase, and the graphical trend for the enforcement of fundamental rights looks to be regressing. The provisions of fundamental rights under Nigerian laws, which have remained mythical in the face of some Nigerians’ inability to command resources at a level sufficient to obtain a basket of goods and facilities judged to be minimum necessities in the current context of the Nigerian economy, are one fundamental issue that needs to be resolved.

 

In this case, enforcing fundamental rights requires self-exile, and the only option left is to make a little wage in order to avoid starving to death rather than spending money on the expensive and drawn-out legal battles that plague Nigerian courts.

The term “Human Rights” has been heard by everyone at some point. In actuality, there are certain things to which you are naturally entitled as a human being and as a member of a certain nation. These items are referred to as your “Rights.”

In Nigeria, we observe Human Rights Day on December 14 each year. Ironically, many Nigerians are unaware of their rights, which makes them more vulnerable to violations.

These are the basic human rights as stated in the Federal Republic of Nigeria’s constitution.

Here’s the Nigeria Fundamental Human Right:

RIGHT TO LIFE

No one in Nigeria shall willfully be deprived of life, except in the course of carrying out a criminal offense for which he has been proven responsible (Section 33 of the 1999 constitution).

RIGHT TO FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT

No Nigerian citizen may be denied entry to or expelled from Nigeria, nor may they be prohibited from traveling within Nigeria or residing in any area of it (Section 41 of the 1999 constitution).

RIGHT TO FREEDOM OF DIGNITY OF HUMAN PERSON

No one shall be subjected to torture or other cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment because everyone has the right to respect for their inherent dignity.

No one may be kept in a state of slavery or servitude.

Nobody shall ever be considered to have engaged in coerced or mandatory labour (Section 34 of the 1999 Constitution).

RIGHT TO FREEDOM FROM DISCRIMINATION ON THE GROUNDS OF SEX, RACE, TRIBE, CREED OR POLITICAL OPINION OR ASSOCIATION

No Nigerian may be subjected to discrimination because of his political beliefs, sex, ethnicity, community, or group membership.

RIGHT TO FAIR AND EQUAL HEARING

Every individual has the right to a fair hearing by a court or other body established by law that is similarly formed to ensure its impartiality when determining a person’s civil rights and obligations (Section 36 of the 1999 constitution).

RIGHT TO PRIVATE AND FAMILY LIFE

The protection and preservation of a citizen’s privacy in their residences, correspondences, and phone calls

RIGHT TO FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AND THE PRESS

Everyone has the right to freedom of expression, which includes the freedom to have opinions (Section 39 of the 1999 constitution).

Everyone has the right to own, construct, and run any means for the dissemination of information, without limiting the breadth of this section’s subsection (1).

RIGHT TO FREEDOM OF THOUGHT, CONSCIENCE AND RELIGION

Every person has the right to religious freedom, including the freedom to change their religion or belief and the freedom to publicly and privately practice, teach, and propagate their religion or beliefs, whether alone or in community with others (Section 38 of the 1999 constitution).

RIGHT TO PEACEFUL ASSEMBLY OR ASSOCIATION

Everyone has the right to openly congregate and associate with other people or political parties (Section 40 of the 1999 constitution).

RIGHT TO PERSONAL LIBERTY

Every person has a right to their own liberty, and no one may be deprived of that liberty unless certain conditions are met and a legal process is followed.

Any person who has been arrested or taken into custody has the right to ask for a lawyer before speaking out or answering any questions.

Any person who has been arrested or taken into custody must be informed of the circumstances behind their detention within twenty-four hours in a language they can understand.

Anyone detained or arrested in line with this section’s paragraph (1) must be brought in front of a court of law as soon as practicable (Section 35 of the 1999 constitution).

RIGHT TO OWNERSHIP OF PROPERTY

Every Citizen shall have right to own immovable property anywhere in Nigeria (Section 35 of the 1999 constitution).

RIGHT TO VOTE AND BE VOTED FOR IN ANY GIVEN ELECTION

Every citizen has the right to actively participate in all elections, provided that they comply with the requirements and rules of the electoral regulatory organisations.

RIGHT TO EDUCATION

Without restrictions or discrimination, everyone must be able to pursue their education at any institution, no matter where it is located in the country.

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